August 12, 2012

How Do You Teach Optimal Digital Citizenship?

Our Social Media Protocols
In years past, I've given digital citizenship cursory attention. I've told students, "Consider whatever you write or post online to be front page news--news you're ready and willing to stand by, defend and explain." That's the rule I use when I post information online. I also set simple protocols to guide students' online work.

Yet, at the end of last year several students didn't follow the protocol and sent impolite messages and images via their Google docs. That reminded me of what I know as both a parent and teacher, you have to be explicit in the teaching and keep the message alive throughout the year--cursory attention to a topic is not enough.

Hence, this year my colleagues and I will invest greater time and effort into optimal digital citizenry education. How will we do that?

Wayland Public Schools Will Use LARK 

Initially, I'll begin with a conversation.  I'll ask, "What do you think it means to be a good digital citizen?" We'll brainstorm ideas and share stories.

Next, we'll go to the "dark side" and I'll say, "What are examples of poor digital citizenship?"  We'll list and discuss those.

After that I'll say, "How can we become optimal digital citizens and also help others in the school to be good digital citizens?"

Then, I'll lead students through an education process of what it means to be a good digital citizen in actions and words. We'll use some (or all) of the resources below.  Finally, the class will embark on a digital citizenship ad campaign--we'll make multimedia compositions (venue(s) to be determined) to advertise our learning. Then we'll take the ad campaign "on the road" and share it with students in our school and possibly beyond.

Throughout the year, we'll revisit digital citizenship and when students make bad choices, I'll use it as a learning opportunity and provide logical, educational consequences to strengthen the learning.

How do you teach digital citizenship? What's your favorite educational video, presentation, story book, poster or other venue?  Thanks for helping out as we embark on this new teaching/learning event.

Digital Citizenship Links
Guided Social Media
Digital Citizenship Introduction.
Lessons
Social Media Etiquette
Cybraryman’s Digital Citizen Links
Protecting Reputations Online Film
Cyberbullying Prezi

Common Sense: K-12 Digital Citizenship and Literacy Curriculum
Greeley, Colorado School Links for Digital Citizenship
5 Ways to Incorporate Digital Citizenship

2 comments:

  1. I love your LARK acronym! You make a very important point when you say this topic must be visited and revisited over and over again. Just like any other social skills, it takes time for students to internalize the concepts of digital citizenship as they grow and mature.

    I'd like to suggest the K-12 Digital Literacy and Citizenship curriculum from Common Sense Media as a resource for this topic. You create an account with them to access their resources, but the resources are FREE. We are using their materials in our district in the coming year. Here is a link to their curriculum page: http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/curriculum/

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  2. Hi Sandy, First, I can't take credit for the LARK acronym as that was posted by the Wayland Public Schools Technology Team (I did create the image however). Thanks so much for the great link. I'm looking forward to trying it out and will add it to my Digital Citizenship Links in the blog. Have a great day. - Maureen

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